Suriname 2018

Posted by on 8th February, 2018

Bishop Karel Cheonnie

The 18th Conference on Theology in the Caribbean Today was originally scheduled to be held in Suriname from June 12-18, 2016 under the theme “Inculturation and Indigenization : Becoming who we are.” However, with the appointment of  Fr. Karel Marinus Choennie as Bishop of Paramaribo on the 11th November, 2015 and  his episcopal ordination scheduled for 24th January 2016, it was decided in consultation with the planning committee in Suriname to change the venue of the 18th Conference  to St. Lucia ( ST. LUCIA 2016) with the understanding that Suriname would host the 19th conference in 2018.

The Conference on Theology in the Caribbean Today (CTCT) is pleased to announce that our 19th Conference (SURINAME 2018) will be held in Paramaribo, Suriname from the 11-15 June, 2018. The venue for the conference is BEZINNINGS-EN VORMINGSCENTRUM ASEWA’OTONO, Prinsessestraat 46, Paramaribo. Under the theme ” Laudato Si”: Caribbean Responses, participants are  invited to enter into dialogue and reflection on the grave challenges posed to the Caribbean region by climate change, environmental degradation, natural disasters and especially, the recent devastating hurricanes.  Guided by Pope Francis’ call for ecological conversion and environmental stewardship, the Conference on Theology in the Caribbean Today (CTCT) has issued a Call for Papers on “ecology and spirituality, theology and the environment, climate change, the survival and rights of indigenous peoples, or any other area of research involving theological reflection on our Caribbean reality today.” The dead line for submission of abstracts is April 11, 2018, but  registration will continue afterwards.

For information on the conference interested persons are asked to contact Ms. Bernadette Salandy (faberns45@gmail.com) of the conference secretariat. Arrangements for  accommodation should be made with Ms. Milka Troon, Tel: +597 473565 (E-mail: asewa.otono@bisdomparamaribo.org). The contact person for the conference in Suriname is Mr. Paul Tjon Kiem Sang, Tel:+597 425762 (work) or +597 8914191 (mobile) and E-mail : p.tjonkiemsang@bisdomparamaribo.org. Regular Updates on SURINAME 2018 will be published on this website, on our Facebook page and our Twitter account, and will be sent by Whatsapp to  persons who have registered.

New Logo for CTCT

The Conference on Theology in the Caribbean Today (CTCT) has a new logo. Designed by Alwyn St. Omer, son of the master St. Lucian artist, Sir Dunstan St. Omer, the logo emerged out of an original painting by the artist entitled “Lan Mè Ho” (“Rough Seas”). It was the artist’s manner of expressing his frustration at the denial of climate change and the impacts on the environment.

New CTCT Logo

When first displayed  during ST. LUCIA 2016, participants unanimously agreed that the painting reflected some of the core concepts behind the mission of CTCT, that is, to develop a way of doing theology which is rooted in our  Caribbean reality.

Alwyn St.Omer with original painting “Lan Mè Ho”

It evoked  the tears and struggles of Caribbean peoples ( the decimation of indigenous peoples and their cultures, the ravages of the Middle Passage and slavery, indentureship, colonialism, neo-colonialism and neo-liberalism)  and the high waves alluded to the rough waters of our fledgling theological enterprise. Through ongoing dialogue with members of the CTCT executive the  artist came up with this final concept which was acceptable to all. For the full story of the logo see “The Making of a Logo”.

Bishop Anthony Dickson to be honored at SURINAME 2018

Bishop Emeritus Anthony Dickson

Bishop Anthony Dickson, Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of Bridgetown/Kingstown, will be honored by the Conference on Theology in the Caribbean Today (CTCT) for his pioneering work in environmental advocacy in the church in the Caribbean, during the 18th conference to be held in Suriname, June 11-15, 2018. Long before “the environment” had become fashionable, Bishop Dickson had promoted environmental stewardship and championed the need for ecological spirituality.

 

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